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Refresh Your Home’s Style with the Most Popular Paint Colors of 2017

With the arrival of spring right around the corner and the promise of warm, sunshine-filled days in the very near future, homeowners across the country are searching for new ways to revamp and refresh their living spaces. Whether your humble abode currently boasts a palette of dated paint colors or you’re simply tired of the hues you’ve had on the walls since your most recent  attempt to update your décor, giving your home a whole new look is as easy as picking up a paintbrush.

2017 Paint Color of the Year

If you’re feeling inspired to update and enhance the colors on your walls but you aren’t quite sure where to start, take a cue from several big-name interior design experts who recently released their top picks for the go-to paint colors for 2017. The Pantone Color Institute, whose mission is to help companies make the most informed decisions about the colors chosen to represent an assortment of brands and products, has selected “Greenery” as its 2017 Pantone Color of the Year.

Pantone Color Institute’s 2017 Color of the Year: Greenery

According to the company, Greenery—a bright shade of yellowish-green that resembles the leaves on a tree or stems on a flower in bloom—was chosen because it represents “refreshment, rejuvenation and rebirth.” In addition to providing your home with a pop of color, experts say using Greenery as the “neutral” hue in their color scheme offers homeowners more opportunities to select décor in other complementary colors without coupling shades that don’t go well together. From yellow and pink to blue, gray and orange, the colors that can be successfully paired with Greenery are seemingly endless, giving homeowners a wide array of options when it comes to choosing a palette that works for their own personal style and décor.

Pantone’s Greenery. Photo Courtesy of Alex Hemer.

2017’s Popular Paint Color Options

While the Pantone Color Institute’s Color of the Year may be the most well-known hue of 2017 among interior designers and color experts, a variety of paint companies ranging from Glidden to Olympic have also made their selections for the most popular colors for this spring, summer, fall and winter. If you’re not finding inspiration with Pantone’s Greenery—or you’re looking for a different option for a separate set of rooms—you’re in luck. The following home color trends of 2017 provide plenty of options for you to pick from when giving your residence the much-needed makeover your property is craving this season.

Olympic’s Cloudberry. Photo Courtesy of: Olympic.com

In years past, beige was the primary neutral paint color of choice for many, but experts now say the popular hue of the past has been pushed aside to make room for more modern neutrals such as shades of gray and blue as well as taupe. This year’s popular picks include Glidden’s Byzantine Blue, Sherwin Williams’ Poised Taupe, Olympic’s Cloudberry, Benjamin Moore’s Shadow and Krylon’s Copper. When most homeowners think of “neutral” colors, these types of muted hues might first come to mind; however, a handful of brighter hues are also making names for themselves as the most popular neutral tones for 2017, including Valspar’s Crushed Oregano, Dunn-Edwards’ Honey Glow and Behr’s Wanderlust.

Behr’s Wanderlust. Photo Courtesy of: Behr.com

Design Tips to Keep in Mind When Painting

There’s no doubt that switching up paint colors in the interior of your home is one of the simplest and most affordable ways to change the look of your living space and overhaul your home, but before you dip your paintbrush into the can and get to work on the walls, it’s important to remember a few interior design tips for painting.

  • Before finalizing your pick for a brand-new paint color, purchase a small sample of your favorites and paint a swath or two on the walls. Then, pay attention to the way these colors change in appearance at different times of day. You may love one particular color during daylight hours, but it could look completely different as the sun goes down.
  • To hide flaws on your walls, opt for a flat or low-sheen paint color. High-gloss paint reflects light and draws the eye to uneven surface, so you should avoid this type of paint unless your walls are completely smooth.
  • Give your room the appearance of taller walls by extending your paint color onto the ceiling, making a border of 6-12 inches along the perimeter of the ceiling where it meets the walls.
  • If you want to make a smaller room seem larger, use pastels, whites or other light colors to create the illusion of bigger spaces.

Regardless of which colors you choose or which rooms in your house you ultimately decide to paint, taking the time to select a new palette that fits your own unique sense of style is a surefire way to enhance your décor and to refresh and revitalize your home this season.

Photo Courtesy of: McCannTeam.com

Explore the Past at Roanoke Island Festival Park

Whether you’re a tourist planning an upcoming Outer Banks vacation and want to explore all the historical attractions the area has to offer or you’re a local looking to take break from everyday life on the beach and start exploring your own backyard, one spot you won’t want to miss is Roanoke Island Festival Park. From a representation of the 16th Century ship that brought English settlers across the Atlantic Ocean to the settlement site where some of America’s earliest settlers set up a permanent colony for England on U.S. soil in the 1500s, this historical Outer Banks attraction offers something for everyone in the family.

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An aerial view of Roanoke Island Festival Park (Photo: RoanokeIsland.com)

Sail Back in Time Aboard the Elizabeth II

If you’re searching for a unique way to take a step back in time on your next Outer Banks vacation, look no further than the shallow waters that surround downtown Manteo on Roanoke Island. Here, history buffs will find a replica of the Elizabeth II, a famed English merchant vessel that sailed the sea centuries ago, transporting colonists and supplies from England to the barrier islands off the coast of North Carolina during Sir Walter Raleigh’s voyages to the New World. Situated on the southwestern edge of Roanoke Island Festival Park, the 69-foot-long ship that is safely anchored in Shallowbag Bag annually attracts thousands of visitors who venture aboard the vessel and get a taste of what life was like for colonists who made the long and treacherous journey on the high seas during Sir Walter Raleigh’s 1585 expedition.

roanoke island elizabeth II
The Elizabeth II sets sail in the Roanoke Sound. (Photo: RoanokeIsland.com)

Costumed sailors in 16th Century attire invite tourists to help set the ship’s sails, swab the decks and explore the lines and rigging that make it possible for such a ship to set sail on the open water. Children and adults alike will have the opportunity to help raise the ship’s anchor, scope out a representation of the original vessel’s tiny living quarters and to search for surprises in a series of boxes and barrels stashed onboard the boat. The ship is also staffed with several interpretive guides who provide answers to visitor inquiries about the historic Outer Banks vessel, its passengers and crew, and the incredible voyage its namesake made across the sea more than 400 years ago.  

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The Elizabeth II, anchored in Shallowbag Bay. (Photo: Seaside Vacations Outer Banks)

Roanoke Island Settlement Site

The Outer Banks may best known for housing tens of thousands of temporary visitors to its beautiful beaches in the spring and summer months each year, but the barrier islands’ most famous residents were those who braved the long and arduous journey from England to Roanoke Island to start brand-new lives in the New World. To honor these early English settlers and educate Outer Banks vacationers about some of the first people to inhabit this stretch of sand in the center of the Roanoke Sound, Roanoke Island Festival Park boasts several unique attractions for adults and children of all ages to enjoy.

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Woodworking exhibit at Roanoke Island Festival Park (Photo: RoanokeIsland.com)

Throughout the Roanoke Island Settlement Site, you’ll encounter a series of costumed interpreters whose exhibits will enlighten guests and explain what life was like for North America’s earliest settlers. Stop by a blacksmith’s station to watch him create unique iron wares, or try your hand at traditional woodworking alongside an interpreter within another nearby exhibit. Kids—or adults who are kids at heart—can play games that were popular during Elizabethan times, try on costume armor that members of Roanoke Island’s military settlement would have worn in centuries past and attempt to perfect an English accent with the aid of the settlement site’s interpretive guides.  

roanoke island blacksmith
Blacksmith exhibit at Roanoke Island Festival Park (Photo: RoanokeIsland.com)

While the Outer Banks of North Carolina are best known for recreational activities ranging from surfing and standup paddleboarding to kayaking and kiteboarding, if you’re embarking on an Outer Banks vacation, make sure you don’t miss the wide array of unique historical attractions at Roanoke Island Festival Park that pay homage to some of the earliest individuals to call this pristine island paradise their home.

Torpedo Junction & Ocracoke Island’s British Cemetery

If you’re a history buff visiting the Outer Banks of North Carolina, your itinerary likely includes popular attractions such as the Wright Brothers National Memorial in Kill Devil Hills, Corolla’s Whalehead Club, the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse and the site from which an entire colony vanished on the northern tip of Roanoke Island. But to fully experience everything the Outer Banks has to offer those with an affinity for learning about the past of this stretch of seashore between sound and sea, a stop at the British Cemetery is a must.

Nestled well off the main road in a wooded lot on Ocracoke Island, the British Cemetery is a historic spot within the confines of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. Maintained by the National Park Service, the 2,290-square-foot cemetery marks the final resting spot of heroic British sailors who fought alongside American troops defending the Eastern Seaboard from attacks during World War II.

national parks traveler
Photo Courtesy of the National Parks Traveler

Soon after American was thrust into war with the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, Germany launched a covert mission code-named Operation Paukenschlag. This initiative—whose English translation is Operation Drumroll—called for a series of assaults on unsuspecting ships sailing within the merchant-heavy sea lanes along the East Coast of the United States. Although today this stretch of the southern Outer Banks is prized for its pristine beaches, minimal development and wide array of wildlife, the area was once characterized by fiery explosions at sea and referred to as “Torpedo Junction” due to the massive amount of submarine assaults that occurred here in the early 1940s.    

offbeattravel
Photo Courtesy of OffBeatTravel.com

Orchestrated by Karl Donitz, a German admiral and U-boat commander, the operation began when five submarines were sent on a journey across the Atlantic Ocean in late December 1941. Unaware of the submarines making stealth underwater advances upon the shoreline of the Outer Banks, U.S. merchant ships continued upon their trade routes, protected only by a handful of naval vessels assigned to patrol this portion of the Atlantic—the majority of which were slow and unsuited to take on submarine attacks. According to the National Park Service, only one vessel—a 165-foot-long Coast Guard cutter named the Dione—patrolled the waters off Cape Hatteras, rendering the region extremely vulnerable to well-timed submarine attacks.

In addition to its lack of preparedness in terms of the types and number of ships patrolling the seaboard, the U.S. also failed to take proper precautions onshore to reduce the risk of underwater assaults on naval vessels. Local lighthouses—including the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse and Ocracoke Lighthouse—remained lit at night, and blackout restrictions were not enforced. With lights along the shoreline ablaze throughout each evening, a brightly lit backdrop was created, allowing German U-boat commanders to easily spot the location of merchant ships passing along the coastline of the Outer Banks.

Photo: National Park Service
Photo Courtesy of he U.S. National Park Service

Having not prepared properly for a potential attack—and unknowingly creating the perfect conditions for submarine assaults—U.S. ships were an easy target for the German sailors, who had years of experience conducting submarine attacks on unsuspecting victims. The result was devastating: In the first six months of 1942 alone, 397 Allied merchant ships were struck and sunk in the poorly protected sea lanes of the Atlantic Ocean. Cape Hatteras—with the bright beacon of light emitted from the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse and the massive currents that converged at Cape Point in Buxton—became a navigational focal point for U-boat commanders. More than 80 ships were sunk in this particular spot that earned the area its nickname of Torpedo Junction.

islandfreepress

Relatively unchecked by unprepared American Naval forces, the German U-boats continued their slaughter of merchant ships. When those in command came to the realization that the loss of so many ships ultimately threatened the entire war effort, the U.S. finally accepted assistance from the British Royal Navy in patrolling the coast of North Carolina and began to strike back against enemy German forces. Bolstered by the aid of 24 British ships—including a transformed trawler called the HMS Bedfordshire—the U.S. was eventually able to regain control of the waters surrounding Torpedo Junction on the Outer Banks.  

geocaching
The HMS Bedfordshire. Photo Credit: Geocaching.com

Although Admiral Donitz called off the attacks on Torpedo Junction in the summer of 1942 and sent his submarines to places that provided less resistance, the U.S. and its British allies suffered greatly from Operation Paukenschlag. On May 12, 1942, the HMS Bedfordshire was struck by a torpedo while patrolling the coastline of the Outer Banks. All 34 British crew members were killed when the ship sunk, and several of their bodies washing ashore on Ocracoke Island in the days following the attack.

Photo: U.S. National Park Service

Outer Bankers residing on Ocracoke Island buried the bodies of these brave British sailors who fought alongside American naval forces next to the grave of another British soldier who was killed when the San Delfino was sunk by a torpedo just one year earlier. The plot of land that serves as the final resting place of America’s allies at Torpedo Junction is now known as the British Cemetery in historic Ocracoke village and attracts hundreds of visitors to pay their respects each year. In honor of their sacrifice while assisting U.S. trips in the fight against German forces, memorial services—including a 21-gun salute and the placement of wreaths on all the graves—are held at the British Cemetery each year on the anniversary of the Bedfordshire’s sinking and attended by locals and visitors to the Outer Banks alike.

ocracoke observer
Photo Courtesy of the Ocracoke Observer

 

History of the Bodie Island Lighthouse

The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse in Buxton may be the most famous lighthouse along the coast of North Carolina, but another black-and-white-striped brick structure—the Bodie Island Lighthouse in South Nags Head—is another popular Outer Banks landmark that attracts droves of tourists to the barrier island beaches all year long. Located fewer than four miles north of Oregon Inlet, the Bodie Island Lighthouse is situated on the western edge of Bodie Island, on the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. Although the present-day tower that still serves as a functioning navigational aid was constructed in 1872, two previous versions of the Bodie Island Lighthouse were built on the same site during the middle of the 19th century.

Lighthouse
The Bodie Island Light Station, South Nags Head

In 1837, the United States government sent Lieutenant Napoleon L. Coste to the Outer Banks of North Carolina to search for potential places to build a new lighthouse that would aid mariners attempting to navigate the shallow shoals of the Graveyard of the Atlantic. According to the National Park Service, ships heading south toward Cape Point from northeastern North Carolina were in need of a beacon of light that could alert them to their position and let them know they would soon be nearing the treacherous waters where the Gulf Stream and Labrador Current converge. To assist these mariners by providing them with plenty of time to alter their positions as they came closer to Cape Point, Congress appropriated funds for the construction of the Bodie Island Lighthouse that same year.

View West
View of the Roanoke Sound from the top of the Bodie Island Lighthouse

Despite the approval of a lighthouse on the southern end of Nags Head in the late 1830s, a series of complications during the process of purchasing the land delayed the construction until 1847. Work commenced on the site soon after, but because the project’s primary manager had no prior experience in the construction of a lighthouse, the finished product—a lighthouse that stood on an unsupported brick foundation—proved to be a total failure. Just two years after construction was complete, the 54-foot-tall tower began to lean to one side. Although several expensive repairs were performed in an attempt to fix the structural issues and save the structure, the first Bodie Island Lighthouse was deemed ineffective and ultimately demolished in 1859.

NPS
Photo Credit: National Park Service

Armed with the knowledge of the proper way to build a lighthouse upon the sandy shoreline of the Outer Banks, the government promptly funded the $25,000 construction of the second rendition of the Bodie Island Lighthouse at a nearby site. This lighthouse was significantly sturdier than its predecessor; however, it also fell victim to an unfortunate fate just a few years after construction of the 80-foot-tall tower was complete. Because Confederate troops who were retreating from the Outer Banks during the Civil War feared enemy Union forces would use the structure as an observation post, Confederates blew up the lighthouse in 1861.

For the Bodie Island Lighthouse, the third time proved to be the charm. Fifteen acres of land was eventuallypurchased from John B. Etheridge 1.5 miles to the north of the locations where the previous lighthouses once stood, and construction on the present-day structure began on June 13, 1871. A seven-foot-deep pit was dug into the sand on the site in South Nags Head, and a wood grillage foundation was then laid at the bottom of the hole. Large chunks of granite and grouted blocks of rock were piled on top of the grillage to raise the foundation an extra five feet from the ground. The tower of the lighthouse was then set on top of the foundation and built to a total height of 156 feet. Outfitted with a first-order Fresnel lens from France, the third rendition of the Bodie Island Lighthouse was first lit on October 1, 1872, casting a beam of light that can be seen for more than 18 miles.

Lighthouse Snow
The Bodie Island Lighthouse in a snowstorm, January 2016

For more than a century, the lighthouse has served as a successful navigational aid for mariners sailing the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, and its light pattern—characterized by 2.5 seconds on, 2.5 seconds off, 2.5 seconds on and then 22.5 seconds off—has become well-known by both locals and tourists vacationing on the Outer Banks for decades. After years remaining closed to the public, extensive renovation efforts were performed between 2009 and 2012, and the tower officially opened for climbing in the spring of 2013.

Lighthouse Renovations
The Bodie Island Lighthouse undergoes extensive renovations from 2009-2012

Guided tours are now offered at Bodie Island Lighthouse from the third Friday in April through Columbus Day, allowing visitors to climb 214 steps to the top of the structure, where they will be treated to incredible 360-degree views of Coquina Beach, the Atlantic Ocean, Roanoke Sound, Oregon Inlet, Nags Head and the neighborhood town of Manteo.

Lighthouse View East
The view of the Atlantic Ocean and Coquina Beach from the top of the Bodie Island Lighthouse
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