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Outer Banks Leash Laws: Rules & Regulations from Corolla to Nags Head to the Cape Hatteras National Seashore

alt="A happy dog sits on the beach with ocean waves and mossy rocks behind him"Stretching from the southern border of coastal Virginia to the tip of legendary Ocracoke Island, the Outer Banks of North Carolina feature some of the most dog-friendly beaches in the United States. Boasting more than 200 miles of unspoiled shoreline along the Atlantic Ocean, this picturesque string of barrier island beaches has beckoned vacationers to its sun-soaked seashore for more than a century—and what better way to enjoy some fun in the sun than letting your four-legged family member tag along on your trip?

alt="A smiling Shiba Inu is enjoying a beach day on the Outer Banks of North Carolina"To ensure your furry friend stays safe during your visit to the beach this year—and to avoid potentially being fined for breaking the rules and regulations regarding pets on the beach—it’s important to be aware of and to follow these Outer Banks leash laws. Whether you’re spending your week of rest and relaxation in Corolla, Kill Devil Hills, the tiny villages that comprise Hatteras Island or any of the beautiful beaches in between, we’ve got you covered with the most up-to-date Outer Banks leash laws for 2019 below.

OUTER BANKS LEASH LAWS ON THE NORTHERN BEACHES:

Learn the rules and regulations regarding Outer Banks leash laws in Nags Head, Kill Devil Hills, Kitty Hawk, Corolla, Duck and Southern Shores.

NAGS HEAD:

Perhaps the most well-known of all the towns on the Outer Banks of North Carolina, Nags Head is also one of the most popular, attracting tens of thousands of visitors to its shoreline each year.

Vacationers who travel to Nags Head with their dogs must keep them restrained with leashes no longer than 10 feet. Dogs are permitted on Nags Head beaches year-round; however, violations of the town’s leash law could result in a criminal and/or civil penalty.

KILL DEVIL HILLS:

Home to the Outer Banks’ largest year-round population, Kill Devil Hills is best-known for being the site where the Wright Brothers launched the world’s first powered flight on December 17, 1903—a historical accomplishment that is commemorated at the Wright Brothers National Memorial.

Because it has such a large population of local residents—approximately 7,000 people—in addition to the thousands of visitors that are drawn to the town for vacation each season, Kill Devil Hills also has some of the strictest Outer Banks leash laws.

During the in-season (from Memorial Day through Labor Day each year), dogs are only permitted to be on the beaches of Kill Devil Hills before 9 a.m. or after 6 p.m.—with the exception of registered service dogs who are being used to aid an individual with a disability.

For the remainder of the year, dogs are permitted on the beach at any time; however, they must be kept on a leash and under the supervision and control of their owner or handler at all times.

KITTY HAWK:

Much like its neighbor to the south, Kitty Hawk is also home to a large population of local residents. This northern Outer Banks town is exceptionally pet-friendly—dogs are welcome on Kitty Hawk’s beaches year-round—although different sets of Outer Banks leash laws and restrictions apply depending upon both the time of year and the time of day.

During the in-season—which the town considers to be the Friday before Memorial Day until the day after Labor Day each year—dogs are permitted on the beaches in Kitty Hawk, but between the hours of 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. they must be kept on a leash that does not exceed six feet in length.

Throughout the remainder of the year (the off-season), Kitty Hawk allows dogs to be on the town’s beaches with retractable leashes up to 12 feet in length. Dogs may be taken off leash on Kitty’s Hawk beaches only if they will not disturb or interfere with other beachgoers and their pets. Unleashed dogs are required to be under the strict control of their owner or handler, and this person must remain within 30 feet of their unleashed dog at all times.

Owners/handlers must also possess a leash for their dog, as well as a bag or container for pet waste removal at all times. Violation of these Outer Banks leash laws in Kitty Hawk is a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of up to $50.

COROLLA:

Situated upon the northernmost portion of the Outer Banks, the village of Corolla is located in Currituck County and best-known for its most famous residents: the herd of wild horses that roam the beaches of this unique coastal community.

Dogs are permitted on the beaches of Corolla year-round; however, Outer Banks leash laws require that they be restrained on a leash at all times. There are currently no restrictions on the length of the leash.

DUCK:

When it comes to Outer Banks leash laws, Duck has one of the least restrictive of all of North Carolina’s pet-friendly barrier island beaches.

Dogs are permitted to be unleashed on the beaches of Duck at any time; however, they must remain under the supervision of their owner or handler at all times as a matter of courtesy and public safety.

SOUTHERN SHORES: 

Spanning fewer than five miles from north to south, Southern Shores’ coastline is one of the smallest stretches of beach on the Outer Banks.

During the in-season—which runs from May 15 to September 15 each year—dogs are allowed on the beaches of Southern Shores only before 9 a.m. or after 6 p.m.

During the off-season—which runs from September 16 to May 14 each year—there are no restrictions on the hours that dogs are permitted to be on the town’s beaches.

Southern Shores enforces a year-round leash law, meaning dogs are NOT allowed to be off-leash on the beach at any time. In addition, the town mandates that leashes must not exceed 10 feet in length.

OUTER BANKS LEASH LAWS ON THE SOUTHERN BEACHES:

CAPE HATTERAS NATIONAL SEASHORE:

Learn the rules and regulations regarding Outer Banks leash laws within the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. This includes the villages of Rodanthe, Waves, Salvo, Avon, Buxton, Frisco and Hatteras, as well as Ocracoke Island.

Beginning in South Nags Head and continuing through both Hatteras Island and Ocracoke Island, the Cape Hatteras National Seashore is the crown jewel of the North Carolina coastline. This 70-mile-long stretch of pristine and predominantly uninhabited shoreline is home to a wide array of attractions, including the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge and the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum.

Dogs are welcome on the beaches of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore as long as they are restrained at all times on a leash that does not exceed six feet in length. However, pets are not permitted within any resource enclosures, on designated swim beaches (signs will notify you of these locations), or inside designated buildings—such as visitor centers, museums, etc.

THE TOP PET-FRIENDLY OUTER BANKS ATTRACTIONS:

alt="A golden retriever with a tennis ball in his mouth is playing in the ocean waves"Looking for some fun and exciting places you can visit with your four-legged friends while you’re enjoying your stay on the North Carolina coast?

Check out our list of the top pet-friendly attractions on the Outer Banks here!

 

 

 

Tips for Winterizing Your Beach House

alt="An oceanfront beach house on the Outer Banks of North Carolina covered in snow during winter"
Photo: A historic oceanfront cottage in Nags Head, North Carolina. Image courtesy of Fine Art America.

 

Whether your seaside sanctuary is a second home primarily used for summer vacations—so you plan to batten down the hatches and secure it for the season—or your coastal cottage is your family’s primary residence and you will be riding out the winter there, owning a home in a seaside community means taking the time to start winterizing your beach house properly. Failing to perform the proper preventative measures before snow, ice and freezing temperatures arrive could cause your home to incur major damage over the cold winter months—the effects of which can be both time-consuming and costly to repair or replace. When you’re preparing to winterize your beach house this season, make sure the following items are on your to-do list.

PROTECT YOUR PLUMBING SYSTEM

alt="Water is shooting out of several places in a broken pipe"
Photo: George Herald

When it comes to winterizing your beach house, few tasks are more important to take care of than properly protecting your plumbing from the potential devastation that can be caused by freezing temperatures. Because the vast majority of beach houses were originally built as vacation homes that would primarily be occupied during the warm spring and summer months, many homeowners find that their property’s plumbing lacks the appropriate amount of insulation to protect the pipes from becoming frozen and ultimately bursting open. If you’re a year-round resident and will be residing at your property during the winter, perform a thorough examination of the insulation surrounding the interior and exterior pipes throughout your beach house—including those in attics, utility rooms and crawl spaces—to check for missing, damaged or insufficient insulation that could put the pipes at a higher risk of freezing up when cold weather strikes.  

alt="A man wraps insulation around a pipe to prevent it from freezing as part of the winterizing process"
Photo: Pinterest

If you don’t plan on spending any time at your beach house yourself this winter—and you also don’t intend to make the property available for potential vacationers to rent out for a week or two—winterizing your beach house is a relatively quick and easy process. While you should always make a habit of routinely examining your home’s pipes each winter to ensure that anything exposed to the elements is adequately covered by insulation, the only surefire way to protect your pipes from bursting when the temperature dips below freezing is to prevent any water from traveling through them in the first place. Before you vacate your home for the season, simply switch off the property’s main water supply, then open all interior and exterior faucets—including showers and bathtub faucets—to completely drain any remaining water out of the pipes.

alt="A home's kitchen and living room are filled with several feet of water from flooding"
Photo: Specialty Restoration of Texas

Neglecting to properly prepare your plumbing system when winterizing your beach house for the cold months to come could result in catastrophic damage if water inside a pipe freezes to the point of expansion—causing the pipe to burst and potentially costing you thousands of dollars in water damage (not to mention an extremely high water bill), particularly if the leak goes undetected for an extended period of time.

ADD INSULATION TO WINDOWS, DOORS & OTHER SUSCEPTIBLE AREAS

alt="Looking out of a beach house window covered in snow on the Outer Banks of North Carolina"
Photo: Stephanie Banfield

Regardless of whether you are staying at your residence throughout the winter months this year or you’re closing it up and heading out of town until spring, checking to make sure windows, doors and other susceptible spots are properly insulated is a key component of winterizing your beach house. When doors and windows lack proper insulation, drafts of cold air are permitted to penetrate your property through small gaps or leaks along their edges—and the warm air inside your house is allowed to escape, causing costly energy bills that can easily be avoided by taking a few preventative measures.

alt="A person adds gray insulation to the interior edges of a window while winterizing their residence"
Photo: Amazon

 

Although many homeowners assume the insulation found around their doors and windows is sufficient as is, it’s imperative to examine the condition of your home’s insulation and weatherstripping every season to ensure it isn’t damaged. Keep in mind that older homes that have not been maintained properly—as well as homes that are used as vacation rental properties and therefore experience more use and higher rates of wear and tear—are much more likely to sustain damage to doors and windows than gently used primary residences. No matter which type of property you own, the first step to winterizing your beach house is a thorough examination of all at-risk areas, which range from windows and doors to attics and chimneys.

CLEAN AND INSPECT YOUR CHIMNEY

alt="Flames shoot out of the roof and windows as fire rips through a beach house in Nags Head, North Carolina"
Photo: The Coastland Times

One item that is often overlooked by homeowners who are in the process of winterizing their beach house is cleaning and inspecting their chimney—a task that is extremely important to undertake at least once each year, particularly if a proper examination wasn’t performed before it was first used in the fall. According to the National Fire Protection Association, failure to clean chimneys is a leading cause of home heating house fires. From leaves, twigs and pine cones to bird nests and tree branches, a wide array of debris can easily make its way inside your chimney and begin to obstruct the airflow. In addition to these types of blockages, the buildup of flammable material caused by incomplete combustion can also create dangerous conditions and fire hazards that need to be taken care of before the chimney can be used to keep your family warm during cold weather.

alt="A stylish fireplace is the focal point of a beautifully decorated living room in this beach house"
Photo: The Spruce

Although it’s possible to perform a quick look inside your chimney yourself to check for debris, deterioration and damage, experts say a chimney check shouldn’t be considered a do-it-yourself job. In order to ensure your chimney is cleaned correctly and that the system is in good working order, contact a professional to handle this winterization task for you. Hiring an experienced professional will not only prevent you from overlooking damage or debris that could result in a catastrophe once the chimney is used to heat your home; it will also provide you with the peace of mind that comes with knowing this important beach house winterization chore was performed correctly.

EXAMINE YOUR ROOF AND GUTTERS

alt="A man wearing a glove pulls a wad of mud and wet leaves out of a clogged gutter"
Photo: All American Gutter Protection

When it comes to the massive amount of water damage that can occur along the roof if you don’t know how to winterize your beach house properly, prevention is a key component of protecting your property. Check the entire length of your gutters to ensure they are clean and free of any leaves, branches or other types of debris, which can create potentially dangerous clogs. If debris—particularly wet leaves—is left unchecked and permitted to build up inside your gutters, it can add a considerable amount of weight and cause them to leak, crack or even tear loose from the roof.

alt="The ceiling of this home is destroyed due to water damage after an ice dam caused flooding to occur from the roof"
Photo: The Ice Dam Company

Likewise, when water is prevented from draining properly due to clogs in your gutters, it can lead to the formation of ice dams when temperatures drop below freezing. Once an ice dam has formed, it can have devastating effects on a residence—ranging from broken gutters and missing shingles to destroyed roofing and major flooding inside the attic or top-level living space—if the problem isn’t remedied immediately because the water trapped behind an ice dam can flow under the shingles on your roof and leak into the house, potentially damaging the ceilings, walls, floors and insulation. Water damage can be catastrophic and costly, so if you own a home along the coast, your best bet is to prevent it from occurring in the first place by properly winterizing your beach house this season.

alt="The flashing on a roof around the chimney is shown before and after repairs were completed"
Photo: Wilcox Roofing

In addition to checking for clogs inside your downspouts and gutters, be sure to inspect the rest of the roof for any damaged or missing shingles, which can lead to leaks in those locations during rain showers or snowstorms. While you’re winterizing your beach house by performing your roof check, don’t forget to examine the flashing—the thin, weatherproof pieces of metal that are installed around windows, doors, gutters, chimneys and other exterior joints—to ensure it is functioning correctly and diverting runoff away from vulnerable areas of the roof.

SECURE YOUR OUTDOOR SPACE

alt="When winterizing your beach house, deck chairs like these on the Outer Banks of North Carolina should be stored inside"
Photo: Stephanie Banfield

Once you’ve wrapped up the to-do list of tasks inside your home, the last step you need to take when winterizing your beach house is to secure the items in your outdoor space. Bring patio and deck furniture indoors to prevent it from being damaged during inclement weather and to avoid it being blown about in high winds. If you are unable to move outdoor furniture inside your home, a garage or shed, be sure to secure it sufficiently in a safe spot so that it doesn’t come loose and get lost—or cause damage to other parts of your property during winter snowstorms or nor’easters.

TIP: WINTERIZING YOUR BEACH HOUSE WITH THE HELP OF A FRIEND OR NEIGHBOR

alt="An oceanfront beach house sits just beyond snow covered rocks and sand dunes during the sunset"
Photo: Flickr

If you own a beach house but won’t be riding out the winter at the property, consider finding a friend, a neighbor or someone located nearby who can periodically check on your home upon request to check for damage and report any necessary repairs back to you. You can’t put a price tag on the peace of mind that comes with knowing someone is ready and willing to keep a watchful eye on your home away from home this winter until you can finally return to your slice of paradise in the springtime.

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