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Laying Concrete in V-Zones

to minimize damage and ensure safety

V-zone

Laying Concrete in V-Zones

During a hurricane, Mother Nature is a force to be reckoned with.  The intense precipitation, flooding, and high winds strip materials from buildings, including siding, roof shingles, doors, and windows.  These airborne debris are a major contributor to home damage and human injury.  Therefore, when building on the coast, it’s imperative that your home is compliant with V-zone building codes.  One building material to be very careful with is concrete.  

V-zone
Large pieces of broken concrete can damage buildings and harm people. Image by Mark Wolfe, courtesy of FEMA

Forceful waters and high velocity winds can cause concrete slabs to hydroplane, flip, or break into large chunks that could damage buildings and injure, even kill, people.  As a result, building codes require such slabs be of frangible concrete.  This means they are designed to break into smaller pieces which will sink rather than travel.  So when constructing driveways, pool decks, and patios, it’s important your contractor follows these guidelines:

  • No reinforcement should be used
  • Slabs should not be thicker than four inches
  • Slabs must remain structurally independent of the building
  • Control joints must be spaced at 4-foot squares to encourage even breaking

When laying cement in V-zone areas, proper control joint spacing and depth are essential.  According to the Portland Cement Association, placing control joints in the concrete surface at strategic locations creates weakened planes allowing the concrete to crack evenly.  Spacing the control joints at 4-foot squares ensures the concrete will break into smaller pieces which will cause less damage during hurricanes.

Control joints may be tooled into the concrete surface at the time of placement or they may be sawed into the hardened concrete.  Regardless, control joints should be cut to a depth of ¼ the slab thickness.

V-zone
Control joint. Image courtesy of Portland Cement Association.

Not only is this control joint approach safer, it also produces a more aesthetically pleasing appearance since the crack forms below the finished concrete surface. This method can reduce the amount of hairline cracks on the surface of the cement.

So, when building your vacation home or remodeling to add a backyard oasis, make sure you only work with licensed contractors who are familiar with V-zone construction and the importance of cement control joints.  If you’d like to learn more about concrete, check out our post about reducing surface cracking.


Blog by Jessica T. Smith for the Coastal Cottage Company

Concrete Crack Prevention

Concrete Crack Prevention

Concrete is appreciated by both builders and homeowners for its strength, versatility, and affordability.  But if you’ve ever had a concrete driveway or patio, you know the frustration of discovering cracks where the surface was once smooth and pristine.

Despite its many benefits, given enough time, all concrete will develop cracks.  But there are methods for reducing the extent of cracking.

So why does concrete crack and what can you do about it?

Too Much Water in the Concrete Mix

While water is necessary to create a pourable mix, sometimes too much water is added.  This becomes problematic because the more water added, the more shrinkage occurs as the water evaporates.  Shrinkage causes the concrete to pull apart, creating fissures.

To reduce the amount of cracking, make sure you know the advised water to cement ratio for the grade being poured.  A knowledgeable contractor will recognize that while it may take more effort to pour a stiffer mix,  a lower water to cement ratio results in less cracking and greater durability.  If you’d like to calculate the proper water to cement ratio, the Concrete Network provides helpful information. 

Rapid Drying

While you don’t want a mix that is too wet, you also don’t want to allow the concrete to dry too quickly.  The shrinkage caused by rapid drying results in greater cracking, so it’s important that the cement is cured.  Ask your contractor how he/she intends to cure the cement, as there are a few methods.  The most common is to flood or mist spray the concrete.   When this is done for seven days, the resulting slab will be about 50% stronger than an uncured slab. 

Lack of Control Joints

Control joints are planned cracks that permit concrete to expand and shrink as temperatures change.  According to builder Tim Carter, properly placed control joints allow you to influence where and how your concrete cracks rather than leaving it to chance.   Ask your contractor about the joints he/she intends to cut to ensure they are deep enough, spaced properly, and cut at the right time (typically within 6 to 12 hours of pouring).

Concrete Crack Prevention
Control joints in concrete slab. Image courtesy of ConcreteNetwork.com

Insufficient Subbase and Subgrade Support

Many homeowners assume that concrete is strong enough to support itself but slabs need foundations much like houses do.  According to Matt Clawson, contributor at Houzz.com, driveways that bear heavy loads will require thicker slabs and more reinforcement than backyard patios.   There are a few levels of support that can be used beneath concrete slabs.  The subgrade is compacted soil; the subbase is a layer of gravel that sits on top of the subgrade; and the base course is the layer of material directly underneath the slab or vapor barrier.  

Concrete Crack Prevention
Levels of concrete slab support. Image courtesy of ConcreteNetwork.com

According to the American Concrete Institute, slabs should, at minimum, rest on a uniform and well-compacted subgrade.  However, soil quality must be considered.  If the soil is too wet, doesn’t drain well, or is not easily compacted, then additional support may be needed.  A subbase and base course can provide a more even foundation as well as reduce the amount of groundwater that seeps up into the slab.  Also, depending on how much weight will likely sit on top of the slab, steel rebar or fiber-reinforced concrete may be recommended.

While you cannot prevent all cracks, having a better understanding of the mechanics of concrete will allow you to ask your contractor the right questions.  Experienced professionals should be able to answer your questions and articulate a plan to reduce cracking.

Stay tuned for our next post about laying concrete in zones vulnerable to flooding and high winds! 


Blog by Jessica T. Smith for the Coastal Cottage Company

Build a Custom Home

5 Reasons to Build a Custom Home

There’s something special about walking over the threshold of a home you designed yourself.  Just like Cinderella’s slipper, a custom built home fits your lifestyle and your needs perfectly.  

While there are numerous reasons to purchase a pre-owned home, today’s newly-constructed and built-to-suit homes offer more benefits than ever before.  So these are the top five reasons to build your own custom home:

Design your dream home 

A home built before 1990 is unlikely to reflect the current needs and desires of most home buyers.  Modern trends such as open floor plans, resort-style bathrooms, professional-grade kitchens, and home theatre rooms just don’t exist in most older houses.  So the biggest benefit of building a custom home is your ability to design it to be exactly what you want.  

Open floor plan in custom home
Open floor plan and vaulted ceilings in a custom home built by the Coastal Cottage Company

“Green” products and construction  

Building codes require higher energy efficiency standards than ever before, which translates to lower utility bills and less impact on the environment.  New homes now feature tighter-sealed building envelopes, energy efficient windows, thicker insulation, and better air filtration which can alleviate symptoms of those who have asthma or allergies.  New construction also allows homeowners to take a whole-house approach rather than adding in elements piecemeal, saving significantly more money in the long run.

Lower maintenance and fewer surprises  

We’ve all heard horror stories of older homes that passed inspection but then a year or two later, the roof leaked or the HVAC needed to be replaced.  New construction has fewer of these costly surprises.  Not only are improved construction methods and cutting-edge engineering implemented, but you also get to choose the best building materials and appliances you can afford.  And many of these elements come with warranties and other guarantees, such as 30-year roof warranties.

Reasons to Build a Custom Home

Improved safety

More stringent building codes and advancements in technology mean that new homes tend to be safer. Hard-wired smoke detectors, garage doors with infrared beams, air conditioners with environmentally-friendly coolants, and materials with fewer volatile organic compounds (VOCs) keep your family healthier and safer.  Safety is especially important when building near the coastline.  Building a custom home allows you to take advantage of the latest innovations in high-wind zone home design and construction.

No renovation costs  

Pre-owned homes can be modified to meet your standards, but each alteration will cost you.  While changing paint colors and cabinet hardware might not be a big deal, removing walls or laying down new hardwood floors definitely are.  For example, the average kitchen renovation costs between $20,000 and $40,000!  So it’s not unusual for a custom home to actually be more economical than an older home that requires extensive renovations and repairs.  

Custom homes offer the latest designs and the safest construction methods, all tailored to your family’s lifestyle.  Why endure the stress and cost of renovations when you can enjoy a home that fits you like a fairytale glass slipper?  

We’d love to talk with you about making that fairytale a reality.  


Blog by Jessica T. Smith for the Coastal Cottage Company

Drawer Joints

Kitchen Drawer Joints and Slides

Great kitchens are both beautiful and functional.  But the best kitchens are designed around each homeowner’s unique needs.  Island or no island?  Open shelving or cabinet doors?  Granite or quartz countertops?  Electric ceramic or gas burner stovetop?

With so many options, it’s easy to overlook something as basic as kitchen drawers.  But think about how frequently your drawers are used and how much wear and tear they experience.  Thus, choosing high quality drawer construction is key to designing your dream kitchen.

In a previous post, we discussed the importance of choosing solid cabinetry materials, so we won’t belabor that point.  Instead, let’s focus on another essential element of quality cabinetry construction: drawer joints.

Drawer Joints

There are a variety of joinery techniques and many ways to combine them in order to construct a drawer.  As with most aspects of homebuilding, each technique has its strengths and weaknesses.  According to Bill Hylton, master carpenter and author, the strongest joint needs to be between the front and sides because that area experiences the most impact.  Dan Cary, from Woodworker’s Journal, concurs:  “when suddenly opened, the corner joints are pulled and when closed, the abrupt stop puts several pounds of stress on the joints, especially on the front.”  After years of pushing, pulling, and slamming, your drawers can begin to come apart.

Drawer Joints
Box joint, Image: Startwoodworking.com

Two of the strongest options are box joints and dovetail joints.  A box joint (also called a finger joint) is a corner joint with interlocking pins that are cut at 90 degree angles.  In contrast, a dovetail joint uses wedge-shaped pins.  

Drawer Joints
Dovetail joint, Image: Finewoodworking.com

Both types provide a large area for gluing and the interlocking pins provide a lot of support.  According to Lee Valley Tools, for hundreds of years, dovetailed drawer joints were valued because they provided a form of mechanical lock when glue failed. With today’s much stronger and more durable glues, the joint has become more decorative than functional but is still a favorite of carpenters and homeowners alike.  However, drawers with dovetail joints can be more expensive because, even with the help of modern equipment, more skill is required to construct a finely made dovetail joint.

Drawer Joints
Left: Rabbet, Right: Dado, Image: DIYadvice.com

Another strong option that requires less skill to make (and therefore can be cheaper), is the dado-and-rabbet method of joinery.  A dado is a three-sided slot cut into the surface of a piece of wood.  A rabbet is two-sided and open to the edge or end of the surface into which it is cut. The dado-and-rabbet joint locks together, providing strength and stability, without the intricate cutting required by dovetail drawer joints.

There are many other types of joinery that will help your drawers last.  Ultimately, you want to avoid the simple butt joint, which is the weakest form of joinery, as well as stapled drawer fronts.  Both will likely cause your drawers to split, crack, or fall apart much too soon.  For a fantastic explanation of drawer construction (and lovely illustrations), check out this excerpt from Bill Hylton’s book Chest of Drawers

Drawer Slides

Now that you understand the importance of solid drawer joinery, let’s explore slides which help drawers open and close smoothly. Drawer slides typically are made of stamped metal and operate with plastic or metal ball bearings.

Drawer Joints
Side-mount slides, Image: Rockler.com

When choosing a drawer slide it’s most important to consider load ratings which range from 50-pound to 100-pound capacities.  Drawers that will hold heavier items, such as utensils or dishes, should use slides with higher load ratings.  

You should also consider how far the drawer opens.  According to Elizabeth Beeler from HGTV, quality drawer slide options range from three-quarter-extension slides that allow most of the drawer to be pulled out, to full-extension slides which allow access to the entire drawer. Under-mount slides are more costly than side-mount slides. However, they also tend to warp and sag less, which saves on repairs down the road.

Drawer Joints
Undermount slides, Image: Rockler.com

Make sure the slides you choose are produced from heavy-duty materials that won’t rust over time and have easy-gliding rollers or ball bearings. When testing models, open drawers fully to ensure they move smoothly and quietly, and that they don’t tilt or feel unstable when fully extended.  For more great advice on quality cabinetry, check out HomeStyleChoices.com published by engineer Rob Levesque.

Finally, if you’re seeking a worth-the-investment upgrade, look no further than self-closing drawers.  Sometimes called soft-closing or feather-touch, these slides retract with a gentle push and include shock absorption that prevents drawers from slamming shut.  Not only will this save your eardrums but will also reduce the stress placed on the drawers, increasing their longevity.


Blog by Jessica T. Smith for the Coastal Cottage Company 

Kitchen Cabinet Door Styles

The Four Most Popular Kitchen Cabinet Door Styles

The holidays are quickly approaching. This means our kitchens will experience an increase in traffic as we host parties and welcome family into our homes.  This is also the time of year we complain about our kitchens and dream of spaces more amenable to entertaining.  The Coastal Cottage Company is here to help, whether you’re considering a remodel, building a vacation home, or just writing a wish list for the future.  This month and next, we will feature posts to help you achieve your dream kitchen!


First, let’s talk cabinetry.  Cabinets are more than utilitarian; they’re the face of your kitchen, communicating style and personality.  They’re also something that can be changed without completely remodeling.  New cabinet doors and fixtures can invigorate a tired kitchen, but the number of options is overwhelming!  So here are four of the most popular kitchen cabinet door styles to get you started.

Shaker

Shaker kitchen cabinet doors get their name from the Shaker furniture style characterized by clean and functional design.  According to Gabrielle Di Stefano, contributor at Houzz.com, Shaker cabinets are made using rail and stile construction (four pieces make the frame and a single flat panel sits in the center).  

Rail and Stile: Kitchen Cabinet Door Styles
Image: Robert Robillard, from A Concord Carpenter


This style has been popular for decades due to its versatility and simplicity.  Homeowners can choose from a variety of finishes.  If you want a more contemporary look, a painted finish looks fresh.  Or, use a glass insert for the center panel.  For something more “shabby-chic,” consider a burnished finish or maintain the natural woodgrain for a rustic style.  Check out this photo gallery for inspiration:
http://www.houzz.com/shaker-style-cabinet-door

Kitchen Cabinet Door Styles
Image: Kitchen Cabinet Kings

Inset

The inset style is characterized by the doors sitting inside the cabinet frame, as opposed to resting outside the frame.  This style is very attractive, but also tends to be the most expensive option because it requires extremely precise measurements to ensure the door sits perfectly inside the cabinet frame with enough room for the wood to expand and contract.  

According to Shane Inman, principal interior designer of The Inman Company, inset doors with exposed hinges is often a nice combination.  Homeowners can choose hinges that reflect the style of the kitchen, but keep in mind that it will add an additional cost (in contrast, hidden hinges are often included in the price of the cabinet box).  This photo gallery includes beautiful examples of inset cabinets with exposed hinges: http://www.houzz.com/inset-cabinets

Kitchen Cabinet Door Styles
Image: Stonebreaker Builders & Remodelers

Flat

Because there are no frames or inset panels, flat cabinet doors look clean and minimalist, making them especially attractive in contemporary homes. Flat doors typically come in wood or laminate, with a variety of colors and finishes to choose from.  Some homeowners avoid cluttering their cabinet surfaces with hardware while others choose modern options like stainless steel or brushed nickel bar pulls.  Check out this gallery for examples: http://www.houzz.com/flat-cabinet-door

Kitchen Cabinet Door Styles
Image: LDa Architecture and Interiors

Beadboard

If the flat kitchen cabinet style is just too plain, you may like the look of beadboard.  Beadboard is made of rows of vertical planks with an indentation or ridge–known as a “bead”–in between each plank.  This gives the cabinet door texture and looks fantastic in country farmhouse or cottage style kitchens.  It can look crisp and cheerful when painted or rustic when the wood is left more natural.  Peruse this image gallery for ideas: http://www.houzz.com/white-beadboard-kitchen-cabinets

Kitchen Cabinet Door Styles
Image: The Coastal Cottage Company

Shaker, inset, flat, and beadboard are a few of the most popular styles of kitchen cabinet doors.  Each reflects different interior design styles and even homeowners’ personalities.  What style would go in your dream kitchen?


Blog by Jessica T. Smith for the Coastal Cottage Company 

Apples to Apples: Comparing Contractor Bids

Building a custom home can be both a rewarding and overwhelming experience.  But this process doesn’t have to be challenging if you’re armed with the right information.  The Coastal Cottage Company is here to help!

In a previous post, we offered advice about the benefits of choosing a design-build contractor.  This post will help you compare “apples to apples” when evaluating multiple contractor bids.  Many folks base their final decision on price, but there are numerous factors that should be considered before signing a contract.  

Comparing Contractor Bids

Communicate Clearly and Consistently.  It’s not uncommon for two different contractors to look at the same project and deliver bids that are quite different. Thus, our first suggestion is to ensure you have provided the exact same information to each builder.  It’s vitally important to be clear and consistent about what you expect to ensure that each of your quotes are based upon the same scope of work.  So do your research and have a specific plan, sketches, and budget to present to each builder.  Otherwise, it will be impossible to compare “apples to apples.”

Evaluate Material Quality.  Builders quote prices using different specs, so if you receive a bid that is quite lower than another, it’s recommended that you dig deeper to determine why.  One way builders underbid each other is to use lower-quality materials.  Every bid should include a list of specific materials and the grade of those materials.  For example, will they be using sheetrock or blueboard and plaster?  Will they lay down sod or just seed and straw?  Everything from support beams and insulation to floor finishes and siding come in different grades, so make sure you know exactly which materials will be used.

Check for Licenses and Insurance. Builders can also underbid one another by using uninsured labor.  This puts the homeowner in jeopardy if anything happens on the premises.  So when comparing bids, make sure that every involved party has liability insurance and there is a workers compensation policy for every person who will be working on the project.  It’s also important to ensure you’re working with only licensed contractors.

Ask About Subcontractors.  Speaking of liability, you should also inquire about the use of subcontractors.  Who will actually be completing the work?  It’s not uncommon for the person making the bid to not be the one completing the project.  So ask about who will be the on-site labor and how frequently the builder will be present.

Assess Workmanship.  You should also scrutinize the reputation and workmanship of the contractors you are comparing.  How long have they been in business?  What do previous clients say about them?  Have they completed projects similar to yours?  Make sure you look through their portfolio of previous projects and check the references of everyone involved.

Get an Itemized List of Costs.  Finally, get a clear breakdown of all proposed charges.  Does the estimate include taxes, permits, and other fees?  Make sure you understand exactly what resources will be needed to complete your project so there will be no surprises later.

Even though price must be considered when building a home, it doesn’t have to be the determining factor in choosing a builder.  Make sure you investigate the backgrounds of the builders you are considering and gather all the necessary information about materials, insurance, subcontractors, and permits.  With all this information, you should be able to compare “apples to apples” and decide upon a builder who is right for you.


Blog by Jessica T. Smith for the Coastal Cottage Company

The Benefits of Design-Build

The Outer Banks are consistently rated as one of the most desirable places on the East Coast to vacation. Once you visit, you’ll want to return, so there’s no better time to consider building your very own home away from home.  But with so many options for architects, engineers, builders, and subcontractors, the process can become overwhelming.  Choosing a design-build contractor may be exactly what you need to make your homebuilding experience fun and stress-free.

WHAT IS DESIGN-BUILD?  Design-build is a construction delivery method that provides owners with one contact point for both the design and construction phases of homebuilding.  One company holds the contractual responsibility for the entire process of building, including coordinating subcontractors.

WHY USE A DESIGN-BUILD CONTRACTOR?  In traditional building projects, the owner serves as the middle-man, managing multiple companies and contracts.  Synchronizing schedules, resolving disputes, and coordinating communication can quickly become exhausting and frustrating.  With a design-build contractor, the owner communicates with only one entity.  The designer and builder are on the same team (or are the same person) and handle all aspects of the build.  This not only relieves stress for the homeowner, but also can result in a smoother, more cost-effective construction process.  

Design-Build

When architectural design is completed separately, designers and contractors may not be in sync, or may even disagree, which can result in unforeseen delays and costs.  In contrast, packaging design and construction allows a single team to know the project inside and out, adhering to a defined budget and timeline.  In addition, design-build firms tend to use their own carefully chosen construction crews and subcontractors who they have worked with extensively and, therefore, trust to complete outstanding work.

HOW DO YOU SELECT A DESIGN-BUILD CONTRACTOR?  To limit risks, you’ll benefit from using a qualifications-based selection process.  Rather than choosing a contractor based solely on lowest bid, qualification-based selection involves choosing the company that has the best credentials, expertise, and reputation.  It’s important to hire a licensed and insured company who offers an experienced team and has a satisfied client base.  

On the design side, you want someone whose tastes are compatible with your own.  Ask to see their portfolio of designs and talk with former clients about how responsive and open they were to suggestions.  On the contractor side, you’ll want to ask about the types of jobs they’ve completed, how much work is completed by employees versus subcontractors, and any speciality expertise (such as green building).  To read more tips, click here.

Homebuilding should be a rewarding and exciting experience, not a nightmare of delays, miscommunication, and surprise costs.  Design-build can help alleviate these stressors.  Contact the Coastal Cottage Company to learn more about design-build and custom vacation homes!


Blog by Jessica T. Smith for the Coastal Cottage Company

quality outer banks home builder

Choosing a Quality Outer Banks Builder

A SHORT GUIDE TO FINDING THE RIGHT BUILDER FOR YOUR OUTER BANKS HOME

Building a home on the Outer Banks can be a very satisfying and rewarding experience. Choosing a quality home builder for your project is paramount to it’s success, so be sure to take time to do your homework. Here are a few things to help find the Outer Banks builder that’s right for you? 

THE RIGHT FIT: Find a quality outer banks home builder that’s right for you and your project. The Outer Banks is home to many residential contractors and home builders. Some contractors specialize in a particular style, size or price range while others build a broad range of homes. Some companies are large and some small. Some have in house design teams and others outsource the design. Start by defining your projects size, style and budget. Decide if you need a professional in-house design team that will follow the project through completion. Then determine if you want to use a large corporate company or a small hands on contractor. Defining your projects needs is key to finding an Outer Banks builder that best suits your project. 

quality outer banks home builderCUSTOMER SATISFACTION: Find out what previous customers have to say. Above all, talking to previous customers is one of the most important steps when choosing your Outer Banks home builder. The information you can obtain from a previous customer is invaluable. A trustworthy builder will proudly, and without hesitation, provide you with testimonials and references. If you didn’t receive a list of  references from your potential builder be sure to ask for them. A satisfied or dissatisfied customer will enjoy sharing their building experience with you so don’t hesitate to contact them. 

EXPERIENCE: Don’t confuse experience for quality and visa versa. You cannot discount experience as it is one of the most important attributes in construction. However, experience does not make a quality Outer Banks builder. Not every experienced architect is a quality architect. Not every experienced doctor is a quality doctor. And not every experienced home builder is a quality home builder. Fact is, every home building company, including the top quality firms, once built their first home. Most new or start-up companies are founded by highly experienced and qualified builders, so don’t be quick to discount them. Instead look for strong overall experience within the company as well of signs of quality construction when evaluating experience. 

TRUST AND COMMITMENT: Building a home is a balancing act between the design, the construction and the budget. It is imperative you partner with a builder who is committed to your project and one that you trust unequivocally. The relationship you form with your Outer Banks builder will be paramount for the projects success. With home construction lasting from 6-18 months, it is crucial to develop not only a professional relationship with your builder but a personal one as well. A great relationship with a builder who is committed to you, the design and the quality of your home will pay dividends in the end. 

quality outer banks home builderQUALITY AND DETAIL: A well built-quality home becomes quite apparent if you know what to look for. Take some time to tour a few homes that the company has built. Be sure to look at both new and older homes. Most new homes look great at first glance but viewing older homes gives an idea of how they hold up to the test of time. Look for quality and detail in every aspect of the home. What products are being used? What brand cabinetry and counters are in the homes? What type of doors are being used and  how do they fit? Look at the miters and joints on the trim? How is the outside detailed and what products are used? Look at the appliances, toilets, tubs, plumbing fixtures and lighting, are they reputable brands? Don’t get caught up by the look of the home, dig into whats underneath the presentation, that’s were you will determine the quality.

LICENSED AND INSURED: Be sure your dealing with a licensed and insured general contractor. North Carolina requires a residential contractors license for home construction and  any construction project over thirty thousand dollars, so be sure to ask your contractor for his/her license number. You can check online with the NC Board of General Contractors at www.nclbgc.org. Be sure to check the license type, status and validity. In addition to a valid license, be sure your builder is insured. Workman’s Compensation, General Liability Insurance and Builders Risk are the typical insurances which should be present throughout a typical building project. Discuss this with your potential Outer Banks builder and be sure the insurances are in place during the building process.  

WARRANTY SERVICE: One of the advantages of building a new home on the Outer Banks verses buying one is the warranty. A new home and everything within it, including all fixtures and appliances, should be warrantied for a minimum of one year. Some builders offer extended warranties and others handle extended service plans. Be sure to look for a structural warranty of 10 years or more. A builder who can offer this type of warranty stands behind his/her work and is willing to back it up.  Ask previous clients about prompt warranty service. Was the service handled quickly and professionally or were the warranty items put on the back burner? Issues will arise in home construction, its just a fact, but how the issues are handled by the builder is key. 

Lastly, you are entering into a long term commitment with your  builder. Be sure you take the time to ask the right questions, check references and look for signs of quality and outstanding character. Doing your homework and choosing the right builder for your new home will make the entire process more enjoyable and run smoother for both you and your builder.  


–blog by Michael K. York, The Coastal Cottage Company

 quality outer banks home builder

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